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PRESS RELEASE: Oakmont Senior Communities refocuses on independent and enhanced living with sale of licensed care communities to partner Pomeroy Living

In response to changing market and industry conditions surrounding licensed care, Oakmont Senior Communities has sold its interest in both Oakmont Rochester Assisted and Oakmont Sterling Assisted, the company’s only care-oriented facilities, to Pomeroy Living – a silent partner and joint-owner of the communities. Also included in the sale was Oakmont Rochester Independent.

Pomeroy Living, who also operates Boulevard Health Center on the campus of the Oakmont Rochester Communities and is a silent partner in all three properties involved in the transaction, was a natural fit for the sale.

 “When the opportunity was presented for Pomeroy to purchase these communities outright from Oakmont and take over the day-to-day management duties, everything fell into place,” said Armen Kalaydjian, Oakmont’s owner. “The care communities will continue to operate at the highest level thanks to Pomeroy’s track record of success in licensed buildings, and Oakmont Senior Communities can refocus on what we do best: serve Metro-Detroit seniors with exceptional independent and enhanced living communities.”

The transfer of ownership has taken effect as of January 1st, 2019.

As the sole owners and operators of Oakmont’s Northville, Livonia, Manor, Parkway, and Sterling communities, Oakmont Senior Communities will continue to be a large presence in the senior living market place and build on its reputation of industry leading innovation for Michigan’s seniors.

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Oakmont Senior Communities is a family-owned, Michigan-based company that has served the seniors of Metro Detroit for more than two decades with locations in Clinton Township, Northville, Livonia, and Sterling Heights. Their corporate headquarters are located in Southfield.

Oakmont Sterling Raises $1,700 for Two Area Families in Need

Inspired the wonderful generosity of the holiday spirit, the residents and staff of Oakmont Sterling Enhanced came together to raise money for two local families in need. With a total of $1,700 in money and other donations, the residents were able to purchase and wrap gifts for the two families which were given away in a small ceremony at the community.

The first family are members of Our Lady of Czestochowa and received gift cards to various stores including a $300 gift card to Kroger. The second family, members of the Freedom Christian Church in Sterling Heights, have two kids and received gifts wrapped in beautiful holiday wrapping paper. Both families were identified and selected by their places of worship.

Oakmont Sterling as well as the other Oakmont communities participate in fundraising and giving campaigns throughout as part of the company-wide Oakmont Cares effort. Check back on this blog for more information on upcoming charitable efforts and events.

Oakmont Senior Communities Donates $12,000 to Deputy David Hack

On Wednesday, December 12th, members of Oakmont Senior Communities’ Ownership and Management joined the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office Rochester Hills Substation to present Deputy David Hack with a check for $12,000.

The funds were raised as part of a year-long Oakmont Cares charitable effort by the more than 1,000 seniors and staff members of Oakmont Senior Communities.

To commemorate the special event, the check was presented to Deputy Hack by Michael Baran – a 30-year veteran of the Dearborn and Taylor Police Departments and the United States Army. Mr. Baran traveled from his home at Oakmont Sterling to be part of the festivities, declaring “I would do anything for a fellow police officer.”

 

 

Inspired by Deputy Hack’s service to the community and news of his recovery, each Oakmont Community held fundraisers, events, and donation drives throughout the year to help raise the funds to donate toward his ongoing recovery.

Special thanks go out to all of the seniors and staff members who donated to the charitable effort, and to the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office for their assistance in helping to facilitate the presentation. Oakmont Senior Communities wishes Deputy Hack a continued recovery, and we hope to see him back in uniform soon.

 

Resident Spotlight: Meet Mary Ann

Some people posses the magic of finding themselves in the right place at the right time – and Mary Ann, who has now lived at Oakmont Manor for the past year, is one of those people. A common thread of fortunate happenstance has followed her through her life including randomly meeting her future husband in a crowded restaurant and coming across an ad for unexpected hobby that would become her passion.

But good fortune smiles brightest on those who are willing to work and sacrifice for their successes, which Mary Ann has done her whole life. And thanks to her tireless energy and kind spirit, all who’ve met and gotten to know her over the years have become the beneficiaries of fortunate happenstance, too.

Here’s her story…

From General Motors to Gleefully Married

Born in Detroit, Mary Ann grew up on the East Side and attended Denby High School with many of her cousins and close family members. Like so many of her generation from the Motor City, she graduated and went to work at General Motors – serving as an Executive Secretary to a department director for several years. Then, happenstance struck: Mary Ann was introduced to the man who would soon become her husband in the most unique of ways.

“We were waiting in a bar restaurant for a table and this man was eating by himself,” she said of the night they met. “So, the host asked would we like to sit with him? Would we mind having to share a table?” The rest, as they say, is history, and when that man would later ask Mary Ann to be his wife, her answer was a resounding yes. The couple was soon married, and with a daughter on the way, Mary Ann decided to leave GM and stay home to raise her family.

From Mom to Manager

The family moved to Shelby Township and life was good. Mary Ann stayed home with her daughter, while her husband supervised many different locations of Chatham’s supermarkets in the area. The family did plenty of traveling  – leaving for two-week getaways just about every year. Her favorite vacation spot was St. Petersburg, Florida, though big city or small, she relished the chance to experience new things and see new places.

As her daughter grew older and more independent, Mary Ann decided it was time to get back into the workforce. She started in Real Estate, but eventually found employment and fulfillment doing something she truly loved: helping others. She found a job at Catholic Service in Macomb, working as a program director for a senior companion program. Using both federal and state funds, the innovative program trained workers to assist at-risk seniors in their homes, free of charge. “At one point, I had 30 people working for me,” Mary Ann said of the extremely successful initiative.

After many years at Catholic Services and grandchildren on the horizon, Mary Ann decided it was time to retire. But those who know her best weren’t surprised when Mary Ann’s retirement didn’t last very long.

Happenstance Strikes Again

Always one who is up for a new challenge, the life-long traveler was again the beneficiary of happenstance’s mysterious fortunes when she saw an ad for an upcoming bus trip. She decided then and there that, thanks to her extensive travel and management experience, organizing trips would be something that she could do for fun. “I saw an ad for a trip and called on it because I like to travel,” she said. “The lady who was in charge of the trip was in Lansing, so I knew I wouldn’t be any competition [to her if I stared planning trips]. Now, I’ve been doing it for eight years.”

Mary Ann plans and enjoys three-to-four trips a year including a recent trip to New York with almost 50 passengers and an upcoming trip to Florida’s gulf-side beaches. “The big thing is, I just pick places I want to go, and that’s where we go,” she said, laughing. Trips usually include plans to visit museums, restaurants, tourist attractions, and at least one fancy dinner with entertainment that combines passengers from several tours. “We’ve met people [at that dinner] from Detroit – people we knew!,” she said excitedly. “They just happened to be on another bus tour.”

Now, a year into life at Oakmont Manor, Mary Ann is thrilled with her decision to join the community. “I’ve really enjoyed it,” she said of life at Oakmont Manor. “I really think it is a beautiful place and it just has so much atmosphere.”

With her kind heart, warm smile, and all-around bubbly personality, that atmosphere at Oakmont Manor is no-doubt a little brighter since Mary Ann moved in.

Resident Spotlight: Meet Rosemarie

The strength of America comes from families like Rosemarie’s. Through three generations intertwined by hard work and military service, she’s become the matriarch of a family made up of six children, plenty of grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren (and counting). Though she never saw herself living in a senior community, she now calls Oakmont Livonia her “home away from home;” a place where she feels safe, comfortable, and happy. But the road there had some interesting twists and turns – and it all starts in Dearborn.

Born in Dearborn; Educated in Canada

Born in Dearborn in the days before World War Two, Rosemarie and her brother enjoyed what would be considered a relatively normal childhood until the war broke out. With four uncles already serving in the war, Rosemarie’s dad was called into service as a military police officer. Her mother, like the famed Rosie the Riveter, went to work in the automotive factories in Detroit.

With her whole family fully invested in the war effort, her mother and father thought her best chance at a great education was north of the border. So Rosemarie boarded a train to Canada, where she enrolled in a boarding school several hours north of Toronto in North Bay.

Though it was a definite change of pace from what she was used to Stateside, Rosemarie enjoyed the experience of living and learning at school. “It was very good, very nice,” she said of the school. “I really enjoyed my time there.”

The Boy with the Strange Last Name

When she turned 15, Rosemarie returned to the States and begged her mother to attend Fordson High School in Dearborn because, as she says, “it looked like a castle.” She enrolled, and it was at Fordson that she first noticed the boy with the strange last name on the roster for her high school football team.

“When I saw that name, I thought ‘oh, I feel so sorry for the poor girl that marries him and gets that name,’” she said, laughing.  But destiny was not to be avoided; a chance meeting with the strange-named boy during her stint as hallway monitor eventually led to a lifelong romance that would last through 65 years of marriage – and yes, she ended up taking his last name as her own.

Soon after the young couple was married, Rosemarie’s husband was called into the armed forces, serving in the Army during the Korean War. The family moved to Kansas where they lived on a military base, and though he had orders to soon ship out overseas, the war ended just before he was due to leave. Discharged from the military, the family moved back to Michigan where they bought a house in Dearborn Heights and he went to work as a printer for the Big Three.

Grown Kids and Good Grades

While her husband returned to work after his service, Rosemarie stayed at home and raised their six children. “I was lucky enough to be able to stay home,” she said of the time. “And I didn’t go back to work until my husband became a little sick, and then I went back to nursing school.”

At the age of 39 and with some of the kids grown, Rosemarie went back to school and graduated with a degree in nursing. She quickly found work during the day at a doctor’s office while her husband still worked nights. The family thrived during this time, and the rest of her children grew up and pursued interests of their own. Some studied to become teachers; some followed in their father’s steps and joined the service. No matter what they chose to do, they all made Rosemarie proud – and gave her plenty of grandchildren.  Having such a large family has filled her life with an unending joy and happiness.

When her husband illness worsened after more than 60 years of marriage, Rosemarie and her children knew it was time for a change. They found Oakmont Livonia, and with the encouragement of her children, soon moved into a one-bedroom apartment. “I’m so glad we did,” she said. “Everybody’s so pleasant; it’s so neat and clean. My children say ‘Mom, this is the best place’ and I agree with them.”